• Top 10 Deadliest Ocean Wildlife

    Welcome to Top10Archive! If humans didn't have enough to worry about while on land, whether it be wild animals, diseases or at our own hands, it's another world when you're in the water and on the turf of some of the most brutal sea creatures. After watching this installment, you may think twice before suiting up to take a dip in uncharted waters. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn Check out our website: http://www.top10archive.net Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/top10archives Follow Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/top10archives 10. Belcher’s sea snake 9. Killer Whales 8. Blue Ringed Octopus 7. Stone Fish 6. Textile Cone Snail 5. Stingrays 4. Sharks 3. Puffer Fish 2. Saltwater Crocodiles 1. Box Jellyfish References: https://en.wikipedia.org/w...

    published: 19 Aug 2015
  • Aleppo zoo animals re-homed in wildlife reserve

    (13 Aug 2017) LEADIN: Thirteen animals from a war-torn Syrian zoo have been evacuated to a wildlife reserve in Jordan. Lions, tigers, bears, hyenas and dogs were rescued from Aleppo and cared for by animal charity Four Paws. STORYLINE: Under cover of darkness, crates roll into Queen Alia Airport in Amman. Inside are animals rescued from a zoo in the war-torn Syrian city of Aleppo. The Austrian-based animal charity Four Paws extracted the creatures from the Magic World zoo. "Hundreds of animals there died due to the war and bombings in the last six years, and from those hundreds remained these 13 animals," says Dr. Amir Khalil, Director of Project Development at Four Paws. Five lions, two tigers, two bears, two hyenas and two dogs were first cared for in Turkey but they have now arr...

    published: 18 Aug 2017
  • Tanzanian wildlife. Archive film 95304

    Tanzania. Safari, cape buffalo. Gnu, wildebeest. Antelopes, Thompson's Gazelle, Jackal, wild dogs, ostrich, zebras, rhinos, (charging). Animal migrations. Lions under trees and eating.

    published: 09 Mar 2016
  • Fears for crops, wildlife, in Serbia drought

    (10 Aug 2017) It's not even over, but already there is increasing evidence that a sizzling summer this year in central and eastern Europe has decimated crops, drained rivers and hurt the animal world. Temperatures in Serbia, Romania, Hungary and Croatia were expected to reach 39 degrees Celsius (102F) again on Thursday following a few days of less oppressive heat. Prolonged drought has destroyed an estimated 60 percent of all corn crops in Serbia, and affected other sorts, according to experts. Water levels across the country have dropped drastically, threatening the fish, the government's ministry of ecology has warned. "This is really sad!" said farmer Pavel Tordaj from the northern Serbian village of Padina, showing withered corn and scorched sunflower on his land. Tordaj said alm...

    published: 15 Aug 2017
  • Somalia's Wild-Life - 1953

    Rare colonial video documentary depicting Somalia's wild life in the early '50's. It shows Italian hunters hunting and killing Somali elephants and other members of Somalia's animal kingdom. It is an unfortunate fact that in 2012, 95% of Somalia's vast wild life have disappeared as a result of poaching, migration and deforestation.

    published: 19 Mar 2012
  • Wildlife numbers hugely impacted in 2016

    (20 Dec 2016) LEAD IN: Climate change, poaching and deforestation have hugely impacted upon the animal kingdom in 2016. This year also saw the iconic giraffe added to the IUCN red list of threatened species while conservationists have been battling to save the northern white rhino from extinction. STORY-LINE: Life thunders by at Kenya's Maasai Mara Game Reserve as wildebeests in their thousands move towards the Mara River, making a spectacular crossing through its treacherous waterways, before heading towards Tanzania's Serengeti plains. But this year scientists warned that climate change, pollution and deforestation coupled with poaching and the bush meat trade has lead to 2016 marking a new low in wildlife conservation. According to the International Union for Conservation of N...

    published: 26 Dec 2016
  • Architecture Archive and Avon Wildlife Trust Cabin Hugh Strange Architects

    galvanizing.org.uk/case-studies/green-architecture/ The Architectural archive in Somerset was designed by Hugh Strange and contains galvanised doors and a galvanised steel frame. Galvanizing was chosen for the guttering and down pipes as well. The Avon Wildlife Trust Cabin is the second example of green architecture designed by Hugh Strange.

    published: 31 Mar 2017
  • 10 NEW Species of Wildlife We JUST DISCOVERED

    Welcome to Top10Archive! Earth is a vast planet, massive to a degree that we may not quite comprehend yet. From an article published by National Geographic, humans have only discovered 15% of the species alive on our planet. The installment that follows will cover ten of those newly discovered species, gems that Mother Nature, up until recently, was able to hide from our prying eyes. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn 10. Bumba Lennoni 9. Etendeka 8. Keesingia Gigas 7. Moroccan Flic-Flac Spider 6. Araguaian River Dolphin 5. Edwardsiella Andrillae 4. Tuberochernes cohni and Hesperochernes bradybaughii 3. Phryganistria heusii yentuensis 2. Limnonectes larvaepartus 1. Ampulex Dementor References: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnbQv6J6XtI https://www.youtube.com/...

    published: 28 Oct 2015
  • WILDLIFE PARK - NO SOUND - COLOUR

    MOST TYPES OF ANIMALS AND BIRDS IN ZOO LIKE PARK. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d19c43a31e564857aa1e50a0cf44abc0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • A Year in the Life of an African Wildlife Photographer with Andy Biggs

    Join renowned African wildlife photographer and workshop instructor Andy Biggs as he shares a typical year in his life as a wildlife photographer by discussing the myriad safari locations he travels to in Africa. Andy Biggs Photography http://www.andybiggs.com

    published: 02 Sep 2015
  • Bandia Reserve in Senegal reintroduces wildlife to protected areas

    Bandia Reserve 1. Exterior of the reserve 2. Close of Bandia Reserve sign 3. Various of giraffes 4. Various of ostriches 5. Set up of Reserve conservationist Tidiane Diop talking on mobile phone 6. SOUNDBITE (French) Tidiane Diop, Bandia Reserve Conservationist: "Today, the Bandia Reserve at a national level is a laboratory. It is a transit area for Senegalese animals. We have animals that come from the Niokolo-Koba (national park in the south east of Senegal). We have the Derby Eland (antelope), which is a very rare species that only breeds at Bandia in semi-captivity. It had never been bred before in captivity, it is only at Bandia, in a protected area, that we could breed this Derby Eland. There is also the savannah buffalos. Also the 'coqs de fassa' (species of poultry) pass by...

    published: 23 Jul 2015
  • When Predators Attack Wildlife Documentary by The World Documentaries Archive

    When Predators Attack Wildlife Documentary by The World Documentaries Archive

    published: 17 Aug 2017
  • National Geographic Documentary - Tiger hunting - Wildlife Animal

    In the wild, tigers mostly feed on large and medium-sized animals, preferring native ungulates weighing at least 90 kg (200 lb).[91][92] They typically have little or no deleterious effect on their prey populations.[62] Sambar deer, chital, barasingha, wild boar, gaur, nilgai and both water buffalo and domestic buffalo, in descending order of preference, are the tiger's favoured prey in Tamil Nadu, India,[91] while gaur and sambar are the preferred prey and constitute the main diet of tigers in other parts of India.[93][94] They also prey on other predators, including dogs, leopards, pythons, sloth bears, and crocodiles. In Siberia, the main prey species are Manchurian wapiti and wild boar (the two species comprising nearly 80% of the prey selected) followed by sika deer, moose, roe deer, ...

    published: 23 Dec 2016
  • Bear hugs for wildlife rehabilitators

    (14 Oct 2016) LEAD IN: An American wildlife rehabilitator is grabbing attention for his hands on approach to helping injured and unwanted animals. Jim Kowalczik is a fan of bear hugs, especially with Jimbo who he's looked after since a cub at his upstate New York haven. STORY-LINE: Jim Kowalczik knows how to give a good bear hug. He's had practice - horsing around with his 1,500 pound buddy, a Kodiak bear named Jimbo. Jimbo is among 11 bears living at the couple's Orphaned Wildlife Center in upstate New York. "They're content. They're happy. If they weren't, you would know it. And I wouldn't be doing this," says Kowalczik Jim and Susan Kowalczik's not-for-profit center takes in injured and unwanted animals. The main goal is to release animals they care for. But they say they ca...

    published: 16 Nov 2016
  • Footage Archive Showreel - Wildlife Images

    A collection of example video from the CambrianFilms footage archive. All material created by Dee Doody Productions, a division of cambrian films. For more info on how to purchase footage and our services, please visit the website - www.cambrianfilms.com

    published: 18 Oct 2007
  • Hundreds of wild elephants relocated to new sanctuary

    (19 Jul 2016) LEAD IN: Wildlife experts in Malawi are embarking on a massive project to move 500 elephants from a crowded national park to a new home 300 kilometres (185 miles) away. They hope the sanctuary could eventually serve as a sanctuary to restore elephant populations in other parts of Africa where the threatened species is being poached. STORY-LINE: This helicopter crew is setting off on a mission to track down elephants in Malawi's Liwonde National Park. The team spots a small group and shoots them with tranquilliser darts. The animals don't know it, but this is the first step on their way to a new home. "Right so they've found a group there, they are busy pushing them down the hill, so this hill in front of us Tinguni, so they are going to try and push them out of ...

    published: 16 Nov 2016
  • New Scientist TV Wildlife archive

    published: 04 Nov 2011
  • Zimbabwean Wildlife - wish you were here - Thames Television

    Description The stunning wildlife of Zimbabwe and the national parks of Victoria Falls and Lake Kariba. Filmed by the team from Thames Televisions wish you were here. If you would like to license a clip from this video please e mail: archive@fremantlemedia.com Quote: VT93773

    published: 29 Aug 2016
  • A wildlife haven flourishes in the demilitarised zone

    SHOTLIST : 1. Wide shot barbwire along the DMZ border. 2. Soldier patrolling the border 3. Close up barbwire 4. Mid DMZ 5. Tracking shot inside South Korean base 6. Wide DMZ 7. Close-up birds 9. Close-up pheasant 8. Close-up a wild boar in bush 10. Sign reading "Wild boar" 11.SOUNDBITE (Korean): Lee Jeo-ho. Sergeant, S.Korean Soldier based at DMZ. "It's easy to wild cats and boars around here. Sometimes I see badgers, weasels and elk. But with the mine fields, I also see some animals with broken legs and other wounds." 12. Various of waterfall 13. Close-up tree frog 14. Set up shot ecologist observing looking through binoculars 15. SOUNDBITE(Korean): Chung Ok-sik, Seoul National University graduate student researching birds in DMZ "In Korea, places where the natural ...

    published: 28 Jul 2015
  • The Struggle To Survive Wildlife Documentary by The World Documentaries Archive

    The Struggle To Survive Wildlife Documentary by The World Documentaries Archive

    published: 19 Aug 2017
  • New Forest Nature Quest (15 min) - Chris Packham in 1995 Wildlife in the UK - Archive Video

    When Chris Packham put us forward to produce a programme specifically about wildlife in the UK for the new owners of the site at Ashurst in the New Forest in 1995, we were delighted to do it. The programme was aimed at younger visitors and to promote New Forest Nature Quest as an innovative new visitor attraction. Our cameraman Paul Cranston worked with a wildlife cameraman Andrew McClenaghan, to film many UK animals, some of which are only very rarely seen. Chris had great knowledge of the New Forest and took us to several secret places where we filmed badgers, hedgehogs, and even tracked down water vole. On the Nature Quest site itself we met a pine marten, stoats and wild boar. It is very sad that New Forest Nature Quest was not a commercial success and closed not long after it o...

    published: 17 Nov 2014
  • ایران کی وائلڈ لائف|Wild Life Iran|SaharTV Urdu

    Broadcast Date-:-March 23 2014 -Website: http://urdu.sahartv.ir/archive/video/ -Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/saharurdutv -Twitter: https://twitter.com/SaharTvUrdu -Google+ www.gplus.to/saharurdutv

    published: 23 Mar 2014
  • People, Wildlife Scooped Up in Texas Rescues

    (30 Aug 2017) Rescue efforts are continuing for the residents of Katy, Texas in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Ken Smith's family left the city on Saturday, while he hunkered down in their home hoping that the rising water levels would not overwhelm his house. After helping rescue some neighbors earlier in the week, Smith he decided to leave after water levels became too high Wednesday, with over 5 feet of water outside his front door. It is not only residents who are being fished out of the water in Katy. Game wardens rescued a deer Game Warden Mark Frayser, with a team of search and rescue game wardens, captured the deer and loaded it into a small dingy. "Since he is a hard-antlered buck, we are always worried about his antlers and the goring," said game warden Drew Spencer. "S...

    published: 05 Sep 2017
  • win7_scenic-demoshort_raw + Wildlife

    RAR supports only RAR format archives, which have .rar file name extension by default. ZIP and other formats are not supported. Even if you specify .zip extension when creating an archive, it will still be in RAR format. Windows users may install WinRAR, which supports more archive types including RAR and ZIP formats.

    published: 27 Apr 2017
Top 10 Deadliest Ocean Wildlife

Top 10 Deadliest Ocean Wildlife

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:12
  • Updated: 19 Aug 2015
  • views: 66481
videos
Welcome to Top10Archive! If humans didn't have enough to worry about while on land, whether it be wild animals, diseases or at our own hands, it's another world when you're in the water and on the turf of some of the most brutal sea creatures. After watching this installment, you may think twice before suiting up to take a dip in uncharted waters. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn Check out our website: http://www.top10archive.net Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/top10archives Follow Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/top10archives 10. Belcher’s sea snake 9. Killer Whales 8. Blue Ringed Octopus 7. Stone Fish 6. Textile Cone Snail 5. Stingrays 4. Sharks 3. Puffer Fish 2. Saltwater Crocodiles 1. Box Jellyfish References: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrophiinae http://www.takepart.com/article/2014/02/24/did-wild-orca-really-just-attack-diver-new-zealand https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue-ringed_octopus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stingray https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_white_shark http://natgeotv.com/ca/human-shark-bait/facts http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/fish/pufferfish/ http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/reptiles/saltwater-crocodile/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_jellyfish https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Box_jellyfish#/media/File:Avispa_marina_cropped.png http://i.livescience.com/images/i/000/034/425/original/boxjelly.jpg?1355348969 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/35/Saltwater_crocodile.jpg http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/75388000/jpg/_75388523_hi001678136.jpg http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/006/cache/saltwater-crocodile_696_600x450.jpg http://media.mnn.com/assets/images/2010/02/pufferfish.JPG https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_white_shark#/media/File:White_shark.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stingray#/media/File:Stingray_teeth_and_jaws.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conus#/media/File:Conus_eating_a_fish.jpg http://www.bioconus.com/conus_victoriae_proboscis.JPG https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synanceia#/media/File:Synanceia_verrucosa_Hennig.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synanceia#/media/File:Stone_Fish_at_AQWA_SMC2006.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue-ringed_octopus#/media/File:Hapalochlaena_lunulata2.JPG http://www.takepart.com/article/2014/02/24/did-wild-orca-really-just-attack-diver-new-zealand https://southcarolina1670.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/white-killer-whale.jpg http://www.animalfactsencyclopedia.com/image-files/animalextremeclose-up-killer-whale.jpg https://myscenicrailway.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/ocho-snake.jpg https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/01/Laticauda_colubrina_(Wakatobi).jpg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nzzv6AX-zuQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pamnZsz68uY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNxJwCGJtsA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqimOYOQjJ8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om9iq4mo9fI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZLZAEkz17nc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1YHNt4GWp4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajIRZ6TGD2Y https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcBmMPJrrKk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnWsqTIANQA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ANyWeW0Umg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qubPx54jMgk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ial4tUYZR0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrMRwddl7iQ Voice Over Talent: www.JimDenisonVoice.com www.Facebook.com/denisonvoice Twitter: @JimDenisonVoice Audio Books: http://tinyurl.com/nlrjbyb
https://wn.com/Top_10_Deadliest_Ocean_Wildlife
Aleppo zoo animals re-homed in wildlife reserve

Aleppo zoo animals re-homed in wildlife reserve

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:48
  • Updated: 18 Aug 2017
  • views: 96
videos
(13 Aug 2017) LEADIN: Thirteen animals from a war-torn Syrian zoo have been evacuated to a wildlife reserve in Jordan. Lions, tigers, bears, hyenas and dogs were rescued from Aleppo and cared for by animal charity Four Paws. STORYLINE: Under cover of darkness, crates roll into Queen Alia Airport in Amman. Inside are animals rescued from a zoo in the war-torn Syrian city of Aleppo. The Austrian-based animal charity Four Paws extracted the creatures from the Magic World zoo. "Hundreds of animals there died due to the war and bombings in the last six years, and from those hundreds remained these 13 animals," says Dr. Amir Khalil, Director of Project Development at Four Paws. Five lions, two tigers, two bears, two hyenas and two dogs were first cared for in Turkey but they have now arrived in Jordan where at last they will have a safe, permanent home. Many of the animals have health problems after living through six years of harsh conditions in the zoo. Khalil says some had kidney problems, one hyena is blind, and a tiger has heart problems. Four Paws says it had the permission of the Aleppo zoo owner to remove the animals from Syria - he himself fled the country after the war broke out. "A person has the ability to escape or become a refugee but an animal is trapped in a small cage," says Khalil. "So I think it's part of humanity to care for humans, animals and nature." And after surviving the war against all the odds, these animals have finally made it to their new home. Al Ma'wa reserve in Souf is welcoming its latest furry residents. Lions and tigers - some still sporting wounds developed back in Syria - are carefully unloaded and placed into enclosures. They emerge tentatively into the unfamiliar surroundings. But are soon exploring and gobbling down food. Mahdi Quatrameez, CEO of Al-Ma'wa For Nature and Wildlife, explains that the reserve already shelters animals from Gaza and Mosul. He says the aim of the sanctuary is to care for wild animals which have been illegally exported as well as those "from catastrophic areas, whether in wars or natural disasters". The Aleppo animals will need to be nursed back to health. "It's very clear from the animal's behaviour that it's not behaving like a wild animal," explains Quatrameez. "We have a specialised and trained team, whether vets or those who work in caring for animals, and there's also a programme for rehabilitation so they can go back to their wild nature." Al-Ma'wa is supported by the Princess Alia Foundation and Four Paws. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/8941c7b48c84050f8bc260a34387ea62 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Aleppo_Zoo_Animals_Re_Homed_In_Wildlife_Reserve
Tanzanian wildlife.  Archive film 95304

Tanzanian wildlife. Archive film 95304

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:41
  • Updated: 09 Mar 2016
  • views: 31
videos
Tanzania. Safari, cape buffalo. Gnu, wildebeest. Antelopes, Thompson's Gazelle, Jackal, wild dogs, ostrich, zebras, rhinos, (charging). Animal migrations. Lions under trees and eating.
https://wn.com/Tanzanian_Wildlife._Archive_Film_95304
Fears for crops, wildlife, in Serbia drought

Fears for crops, wildlife, in Serbia drought

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:40
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2017
  • views: 106
videos
(10 Aug 2017) It's not even over, but already there is increasing evidence that a sizzling summer this year in central and eastern Europe has decimated crops, drained rivers and hurt the animal world. Temperatures in Serbia, Romania, Hungary and Croatia were expected to reach 39 degrees Celsius (102F) again on Thursday following a few days of less oppressive heat. Prolonged drought has destroyed an estimated 60 percent of all corn crops in Serbia, and affected other sorts, according to experts. Water levels across the country have dropped drastically, threatening the fish, the government's ministry of ecology has warned. "This is really sad!" said farmer Pavel Tordaj from the northern Serbian village of Padina, showing withered corn and scorched sunflower on his land. Tordaj said almost entire corn crops and half of the sunflower have been destroyed by the drought. He said it will be very hard for the farmers to make up for the loss. Experts said that corn - as a key sort - accounts for around one million hectares (2.4 million acres) of crops in Serbia, which has a poorly-developed watering system. Overall, around 60 percent have been destroyed, estimated Zeljko Kaitovic from the state-run Maize Research Institute. "Unfortunately, extreme drought conditions caught the corn in the most sensitive phase of development," he said. Serbian government officials have said that the consequences of this year's drought will be covered from state reserves. The government has urged consumers to be cautious with water usage and appealed to factories to refrain from dropping waste into drained rivers where fish already face a lack of oxygen. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4e321387ea12fa45a1027773ac44ae49 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Fears_For_Crops,_Wildlife,_In_Serbia_Drought
Somalia's Wild-Life - 1953

Somalia's Wild-Life - 1953

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:33
  • Updated: 19 Mar 2012
  • views: 15117
videos
Rare colonial video documentary depicting Somalia's wild life in the early '50's. It shows Italian hunters hunting and killing Somali elephants and other members of Somalia's animal kingdom. It is an unfortunate fact that in 2012, 95% of Somalia's vast wild life have disappeared as a result of poaching, migration and deforestation.
https://wn.com/Somalia's_Wild_Life_1953
Wildlife numbers hugely impacted in 2016

Wildlife numbers hugely impacted in 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:59
  • Updated: 26 Dec 2016
  • views: 184
videos
(20 Dec 2016) LEAD IN: Climate change, poaching and deforestation have hugely impacted upon the animal kingdom in 2016. This year also saw the iconic giraffe added to the IUCN red list of threatened species while conservationists have been battling to save the northern white rhino from extinction. STORY-LINE: Life thunders by at Kenya's Maasai Mara Game Reserve as wildebeests in their thousands move towards the Mara River, making a spectacular crossing through its treacherous waterways, before heading towards Tanzania's Serengeti plains. But this year scientists warned that climate change, pollution and deforestation coupled with poaching and the bush meat trade has lead to 2016 marking a new low in wildlife conservation. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) around 50 animals each year take one step closer to extinction. Currently 41% of all amphibians and 25% of mammals are under threat. In December the IUCN added the world's tallest mammal to that list. The gentle, graceful giraffe went from "Least Concern" to "Vulnerable" due a dramatic decline in numbers. The most endangered of the species is the Rothschild giraffe, seen here at Kenya's Giraffe Centre in Nairobi. Its population fell to just 140 in the early 1980s, according to Alex Motuko, who works at Kenya's Giraffe Centre as a conservation educator. "People started clearing down the vegetation to create room for agriculture, so in the process the giraffes started dying due to lack of food. And also human beings used to kill them in case they invaded crop fields," he says. Despite furious efforts by conservationists, 2016 has seen a decline in rhino numbers across Africa. This is Sudan, the last male northern white rhino on the planet. He lives at the OlPejeta conservancy in central Kenya along with two females, Fatu and Najin. Since his fellow male, Suni ,died last year, the fate of the northern white rhino species rests on Sudan's shoulders. Seen here in February 2016, rangers say Sudan is surviving but his health is deteriorating and he is showing significant signs of aging. At 43 years old, he is too elderly to breed. Conservationists are continuing to explore the possibility of IVF using his stored sperm. Rhinos are native to South Sudan, Congo, Central Africa Republic and Chad. These are all countries that have witnessed years of civil wars making conservation efforts there futile. Some 1,175 rhinoceros were killed and 317 poachers were arrested in South Africa during 2015 according to South Africa's Department of Environmental Affairs. Rhino horn, with a street value of around 65,000 dollars, is believed to be an aphrodisiac in some Asian countries. In South Africa conservationists used drones with night vision and thermal cameras to try to track down poachers before they get a chance to kill. And at the Gwahumbe Game Reserve in Kwazulu-Natal province, they turned to desperate measures in the hope of deterring poachers hungry for rhino horn. It looks drastic - and it is. But the staff here believe that de-horning this rhino themselves will save its life. Dehorning in this way does not physically harm the animal. The thinking behind the practice is that no poacher would go to such effort, risk or expense to dehorn a rhino in this way - the animals are killed outright before the poachers approach to take their horns. This way the poachers have little or no horn to kill for. But since some of the horn has to remain in order not to hurt the animal, conservationists fear even this last resort attempt will not deter the poachers for long. But the fight against poachers continues. In April 2016 1.3 tonnes of rhino horn were destroyed in Kenya. So too were 120 tonnes of elephant ivory. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/15833d9af8ed2cb5e9a3ae0ec355a61f Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Wildlife_Numbers_Hugely_Impacted_In_2016
Architecture Archive and Avon Wildlife Trust Cabin   Hugh Strange Architects

Architecture Archive and Avon Wildlife Trust Cabin Hugh Strange Architects

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:04
  • Updated: 31 Mar 2017
  • views: 36
videos
galvanizing.org.uk/case-studies/green-architecture/ The Architectural archive in Somerset was designed by Hugh Strange and contains galvanised doors and a galvanised steel frame. Galvanizing was chosen for the guttering and down pipes as well. The Avon Wildlife Trust Cabin is the second example of green architecture designed by Hugh Strange.
https://wn.com/Architecture_Archive_And_Avon_Wildlife_Trust_Cabin_Hugh_Strange_Architects
10 NEW Species of Wildlife We JUST DISCOVERED

10 NEW Species of Wildlife We JUST DISCOVERED

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:18
  • Updated: 28 Oct 2015
  • views: 2813743
videos
Welcome to Top10Archive! Earth is a vast planet, massive to a degree that we may not quite comprehend yet. From an article published by National Geographic, humans have only discovered 15% of the species alive on our planet. The installment that follows will cover ten of those newly discovered species, gems that Mother Nature, up until recently, was able to hide from our prying eyes. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn 10. Bumba Lennoni 9. Etendeka 8. Keesingia Gigas 7. Moroccan Flic-Flac Spider 6. Araguaian River Dolphin 5. Edwardsiella Andrillae 4. Tuberochernes cohni and Hesperochernes bradybaughii 3. Phryganistria heusii yentuensis 2. Limnonectes larvaepartus 1. Ampulex Dementor References: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnbQv6J6XtI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVg2EJvvlF8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvBCmY7wAAU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0MrgI97GYw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmhohRXn_LY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmfLlBKGMuU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCNBoF5b7f0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPSriCpFCpc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO1tS0RJeo4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tax5JR63E5s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4odlo0Afjs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lwuItwsyP4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJhTrPDUoxs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9oxmRT2YWw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOtGbzUtjiw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RerXsbuJ1S4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbCAFt2b4lI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNJSWlMsQ58 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZWBwCXzQhw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQEiYWGitKs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNnJ1mOkIx8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBYvCJLb7tE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F2Z-kJ-1Ho https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-63JgNPB5jg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXy5DehVTBE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywEjrCFy3iI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhjkeZm9Lu0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BasY65AOJ54 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYCcT0s5elo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E77UIKvO1Ic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siV92DtLIFc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHUlbZwtik0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMe2JP_HvTM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ySwuQhruBo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKhEFVAoScI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWAV1zj5TXQ Voice Over Talent: https://www.youtube.com/user/thought2
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WILDLIFE PARK - NO SOUND - COLOUR

WILDLIFE PARK - NO SOUND - COLOUR

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  • Duration: 10:50
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 72
videos
MOST TYPES OF ANIMALS AND BIRDS IN ZOO LIKE PARK. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d19c43a31e564857aa1e50a0cf44abc0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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A Year in the Life of an African Wildlife Photographer with Andy Biggs

A Year in the Life of an African Wildlife Photographer with Andy Biggs

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  • Duration: 1:04:03
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2015
  • views: 32587
videos
Join renowned African wildlife photographer and workshop instructor Andy Biggs as he shares a typical year in his life as a wildlife photographer by discussing the myriad safari locations he travels to in Africa. Andy Biggs Photography http://www.andybiggs.com
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Bandia Reserve in Senegal reintroduces wildlife to protected areas

Bandia Reserve in Senegal reintroduces wildlife to protected areas

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  • Duration: 6:07
  • Updated: 23 Jul 2015
  • views: 961
videos
Bandia Reserve 1. Exterior of the reserve 2. Close of Bandia Reserve sign 3. Various of giraffes 4. Various of ostriches 5. Set up of Reserve conservationist Tidiane Diop talking on mobile phone 6. SOUNDBITE (French) Tidiane Diop, Bandia Reserve Conservationist: "Today, the Bandia Reserve at a national level is a laboratory. It is a transit area for Senegalese animals. We have animals that come from the Niokolo-Koba (national park in the south east of Senegal). We have the Derby Eland (antelope), which is a very rare species that only breeds at Bandia in semi-captivity. It had never been bred before in captivity, it is only at Bandia, in a protected area, that we could breed this Derby Eland. There is also the savannah buffalos. Also the 'coqs de fassa' (species of poultry) pass by here. So the Bandia Reserve is a transit area to repopulate other regions of Senegal with wildlife." 7. Tilt down of one thousand year old baobab tree 8. SOUNDBITE (French) Tidiane Diop, Bandia Reserve Conservationist; "We are in front of a 'Griot' (West African bard, or wandering musician) tomb. Here you see human bones of a 'Griot'. In Africa, the 'Griots' are living libraries. Here, we are in front of the 'Griots' of the 'Serere Saffene'. These 'Griots' were buried inside baobab trees. Since they were singing, dancing and narrating history, they were considered unproductive so people didn't want to bury them in the ground but they used to put them in the cavity of baobab trees." 9. Various of skulls 10. Kudu (species of antelope) 11. Wide of lake 12. Wide of crocodile Dakar 13. Busy street 14. SOUNDBITE (French) Demba Ba, Technical advisor to the Minister of the Environment and the Protection of Nature : "Efforts are made to preserve the fauna that has suffered because of poaching. We have to admit it, we are a poor country. The protected areas are principally within the countryside and are surrounded by villages with very poor people. This means there is a pressure on the natural resources. We have been confronted with this difficulty since the people have hunted the fauna in the parks in order to eat. So we have developed a very pro-active policy of awareness that educates the population and involves it in the management of the protected areas." Bandia Reserve 15. Derby Eland (type of antelope) grazing 16. SOUNDBITE (French) Ousmane Niang, Bandia Reserve Ranger: "Here we have a compound of approximately 60 hectares dedicated to Derby Elands. The reason is simple; the Derby Eland is the biggest antelope in the world. There is one kind in Senegal and one in Cameroon, but it is a much endangered species; almost extinct. The last report done in the Niokolo-Koba National Park in the south east of Senegal is very alarming. So the Bandia Reserve in 2000 initiated a project, in order to save them. It has not been easy since all previous breeding attempts have failed. Bandia started with a sample of 5 animals, 6 years ago. Today the number is up to approximately 27. It is the only known breeding example in semi-captivity of Derby elands which has been successful. Its aim is to save this endangered species." 17. Various of Derby elands 18. Giant tortoise LEAD IN: More than 16-thousand species of animal around the globe are now threatened with extinction, according to the World Conservation Union. In West Africa poaching, regional conflict and the destruction of natural habitat have already seen the demise of the black rhino with many more species under threat. The Senegalese government are running projects, along side other private enterprises, to reintroduce endangered wildlife within protected areas of the country. STORYLINE: The Bandia Game Reserve is situated 65 kilometres (40 miles) south of the capital city, Dakar. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/5d237d5d4dd6c3c46b26ee72493ad7fc Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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When Predators Attack Wildlife Documentary by The World Documentaries Archive

When Predators Attack Wildlife Documentary by The World Documentaries Archive

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  • Duration: 42:52
  • Updated: 17 Aug 2017
  • views: 2
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National Geographic Documentary - Tiger hunting - Wildlife Animal

National Geographic Documentary - Tiger hunting - Wildlife Animal

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  • Duration: 38:31
  • Updated: 23 Dec 2016
  • views: 19594
videos
In the wild, tigers mostly feed on large and medium-sized animals, preferring native ungulates weighing at least 90 kg (200 lb).[91][92] They typically have little or no deleterious effect on their prey populations.[62] Sambar deer, chital, barasingha, wild boar, gaur, nilgai and both water buffalo and domestic buffalo, in descending order of preference, are the tiger's favoured prey in Tamil Nadu, India,[91] while gaur and sambar are the preferred prey and constitute the main diet of tigers in other parts of India.[93][94] They also prey on other predators, including dogs, leopards, pythons, sloth bears, and crocodiles. In Siberia, the main prey species are Manchurian wapiti and wild boar (the two species comprising nearly 80% of the prey selected) followed by sika deer, moose, roe deer, and musk deer.[95] Asiatic black bears and Ussuri brown bears may also fall prey to tigers,[44][96][97] and they constitute up to 40.7% of the diet of Siberian tigers depending on local conditions and the bear populations.[98] In Sumatra, prey include sambar deer, muntjac, wild boar, Malayan tapir and orangutan.[99][100] In the former Caspian tiger's range, prey included saiga antelope, camels, Caucasian wisent, yak, and wild horses. Like many predators, tigers are opportunistic and may eat much smaller prey, such as monkeys, peafowl and other ground-based birds, hares, porcupines, and fish. Tigers are thought to be mainly nocturnal predators,[107] but in areas where humans are typically absent, they have been observed via remote-controlled, hidden cameras, hunting in daylight.[108] They generally hunt alone and ambush their prey as most other cats do, overpowering them from any angle, using their body size and strength to knock the prey off balance. Successful hunts usually require the tiger to almost simultaneously leap onto its quarry, knock it over, and grab the throat or nape with its teeth.[62] Despite their large size, tigers can reach speeds of about 49–65 km/h (30–40 mph) but only in short bursts; consequently, tigers must be close to their prey before they break cover. If the prey catches wind of the tiger's presence before this, the tiger usually abandons the hunt rather than chase prey or battle it head-on. Horizontal leaps of up to 10 m (33 ft) have been reported, although leaps of around half this distance are more typical. One in 2 to 20 hunts, including stalking near potential prey, ends in a successful kill.[62][109][110] When hunting larger animals, tigers prefer to bite the throat and use their powerful forelimbs to hold onto the prey, often simultaneously wrestling it to the ground. The tiger remains latched onto the neck until its target dies of strangulation.[60] By this method, gaurs and water buffaloes weighing over a ton have been killed by tigers weighing about a sixth as much.[111] Although they can kill healthy adults, tigers often select the calves or infirm of very large species.[112] Healthy adult prey of this type can be dangerous to tackle, as long, strong horns, legs and tusks are all potentially fatal to the tiger. No other extant land predator routinely takes on prey this large on their own.[113][114] Whilst hunting sambars, which comprise up to 60% of their prey in India, tigers have reportedly made a passable impersonation of the male sambar's rutting call to attract them.[91][105] With smaller prey, such as monkeys and hares, the tiger bites the nape, often breaking the spinal cord, piercing the windpipe, or severing the jugular vein or common carotid artery.[115] Though rarely observed, some tigers have been recorded to kill prey by swiping with their paws, which are powerful enough to smash the skulls of domestic cattle,[105] and break the backs of sloth bears.
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Bear hugs for wildlife rehabilitators

Bear hugs for wildlife rehabilitators

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  • Duration: 2:34
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2016
  • views: 4013
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(14 Oct 2016) LEAD IN: An American wildlife rehabilitator is grabbing attention for his hands on approach to helping injured and unwanted animals. Jim Kowalczik is a fan of bear hugs, especially with Jimbo who he's looked after since a cub at his upstate New York haven. STORY-LINE: Jim Kowalczik knows how to give a good bear hug. He's had practice - horsing around with his 1,500 pound buddy, a Kodiak bear named Jimbo. Jimbo is among 11 bears living at the couple's Orphaned Wildlife Center in upstate New York. "They're content. They're happy. If they weren't, you would know it. And I wouldn't be doing this," says Kowalczik Jim and Susan Kowalczik's not-for-profit center takes in injured and unwanted animals. The main goal is to release animals they care for. But they say they can't with the bears either because of injuries or because they were already used to living in captivity. While there are plenty of wildlife rehabilitators and other centers that care for bears, none do it quite like Kowalczik. His hands-on approach has garnered international attention The 60-year-old retired corrections officer says its not for show. He's just bullish on bears. "There's no false pretences like there are with people and stuff. What you see is what you get," he says. Experts warn not to try this with any bear. One wildlife rehabilitator says she worries people seeing the videos will think they can play with or feed wild bears. "The message it sends concerns me _ that everything can be a pet, everything can be habituated. Even a 1,500-pound bear can be your friend," says wildlife rehabilitator Missy Runyan. Kowalczik says the biggest problem with Jimbo, who he's had for 23 years, is making sure he doesn't lay on him Where some see danger he prefers to grin and bear it. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/43b66fb3a3667afa5b56cbc0ec82b7bf Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Footage Archive Showreel - Wildlife Images

Footage Archive Showreel - Wildlife Images

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  • Duration: 8:49
  • Updated: 18 Oct 2007
  • views: 561
videos
A collection of example video from the CambrianFilms footage archive. All material created by Dee Doody Productions, a division of cambrian films. For more info on how to purchase footage and our services, please visit the website - www.cambrianfilms.com
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Hundreds of wild elephants relocated to new sanctuary

Hundreds of wild elephants relocated to new sanctuary

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  • Duration: 7:18
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2016
  • views: 232
videos
(19 Jul 2016) LEAD IN: Wildlife experts in Malawi are embarking on a massive project to move 500 elephants from a crowded national park to a new home 300 kilometres (185 miles) away. They hope the sanctuary could eventually serve as a sanctuary to restore elephant populations in other parts of Africa where the threatened species is being poached. STORY-LINE: This helicopter crew is setting off on a mission to track down elephants in Malawi's Liwonde National Park. The team spots a small group and shoots them with tranquilliser darts. The animals don't know it, but this is the first step on their way to a new home. "Right so they've found a group there, they are busy pushing them down the hill, so this hill in front of us Tinguni, so they are going to try and push them out of the woodland and then try and try and get them on to the floodplain," says conservationist Kester Vickery, who is leading the team on the ground. Once the animals are sedated, they are checked by vets and fitted with tracking collars, before being hoisted onto trucks. This massive operation aims to relocate 500 elephants from two wildlife parks, Majete and Liwonde, to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve 300 kilometres (185 miles) away. Craig Reid, Liwonde National Park Manager says moving the elephants is necessary to stop them coming into conflict with people. "Here in Liwonde we have too many elephants with a very high density of people around the park, so there's a lot of human wildlife conflict and moving the elephants from Liwonde will reduce the pressure on the local communities," he says. "And then on the other hand at Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve we are busy setting up a national elephant sanctuary for Malawi. So having 500 elephants there by the end of next year will set it up extremely well as a significant elephant conservation project." Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve is a park of 700 square miles (1,800 square kilometres) with more space and security for the elephants. The relocation by African Parks, a non-profit group based in Johannesburg, comes amid increasing pressure on wildlife across much of Africa. There is particular pressure on elephants, which have been slaughtered in large numbers to meet growing demand for ivory, mostly in parts of Asia. The conservationists hope that they can build a thriving elephant population at Nkhotakota, which could be used to supply elephants to parts of Africa where the species has been badly affected by poaching. The Dutch PostCode Lottery, which supports a number of charity programs, is a key funder of the 1.6 million US dollar relocation project. African Parks Malawi country director, Patricio Ndadzela, says transporting the elephants is a massive undertaking. "It's not easy, it's not easy. Imagine we are spending 1,6 million (US) dollars, hiring all the expertise, all the vehicles, the helicopters and the sort of logistics that goes with getting this done," he says. "Well, I mean our priority is to ensure that the animals are alive, but I think there are a lot of associated problems, vehicle break downs, sometimes animals getting injured or sometime they die, but I think above all, I think this is a huge task it has never happened before in Africa. I understand Zimbabwe tried it, but they didn't get as much as 500 elephants in two years. This is a record. It's a record." African Parks manages all three reserves involved in the operation. Nkhotakota currently has fewer than 100 elephants, whereas Malawi has up to 1,500 elephants in total. The World Wildlife Fund estimates that Africa has fewer than 470,000 elephants, down from as many as three million to five million in the early 20th century. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/a152484488fa21168b051e6bee357d8d Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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New Scientist TV  Wildlife archive

New Scientist TV Wildlife archive

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  • Duration: 0:44
  • Updated: 04 Nov 2011
  • views: 97
videos
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Zimbabwean Wildlife - wish you were here - Thames Television

Zimbabwean Wildlife - wish you were here - Thames Television

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  • Duration: 2:22
  • Updated: 29 Aug 2016
  • views: 230
videos
Description The stunning wildlife of Zimbabwe and the national parks of Victoria Falls and Lake Kariba. Filmed by the team from Thames Televisions wish you were here. If you would like to license a clip from this video please e mail: archive@fremantlemedia.com Quote: VT93773
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A wildlife haven flourishes in the  demilitarised zone

A wildlife haven flourishes in the demilitarised zone

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  • Duration: 3:20
  • Updated: 28 Jul 2015
  • views: 897
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SHOTLIST : 1. Wide shot barbwire along the DMZ border. 2. Soldier patrolling the border 3. Close up barbwire 4. Mid DMZ 5. Tracking shot inside South Korean base 6. Wide DMZ 7. Close-up birds 9. Close-up pheasant 8. Close-up a wild boar in bush 10. Sign reading "Wild boar" 11.SOUNDBITE (Korean): Lee Jeo-ho. Sergeant, S.Korean Soldier based at DMZ. "It's easy to wild cats and boars around here. Sometimes I see badgers, weasels and elk. But with the mine fields, I also see some animals with broken legs and other wounds." 12. Various of waterfall 13. Close-up tree frog 14. Set up shot ecologist observing looking through binoculars 15. SOUNDBITE(Korean): Chung Ok-sik, Seoul National University graduate student researching birds in DMZ "In Korea, places where the natural habitat is retained are decreasing. Various species live here so far, so it's an important place " 16. Various South Korean soldiers on a military truck 17. Military truck leaving the base 18. SOUNDBITE: (Korean) Chung Ok-sik, Seoul National University graduate student researching birds in DMZ "If the two Koreas are ever reunited, if this place becomes developed, there is no plan ready to preserve the habitat. The demands for development of this area is already high and we have to consider the people who have rights to the property here," 19. Various of wild boars 20. Close up a pheasant behind the sign attached on barbwire reading " landmine". SUGGESTED LEAD IN: Within earshot of a truck load of South Korean troops, a family of wild boars approach a military base looking for an afternoon snack. Just down the road, a pheasant strolls into a forest dotted with mines. Off-limits to most humans for more than 50 years and home to some 2 million soldiers, the Demilitarised Zone separating the two Koreas that forms the world's most heavily fortified border, has become an unlikely haven for wildlife. STORYLINE : Once dotted with farms and villages, the 240-kilometre (150-mile) long, 4-kilometre (2.5-mile) wide demarcation zone and the adjacent civilian controlled zones to the south underwent a radical makeover after the Korean War ended in 1953. Civilians are mostly banned and scenes of tranquil village life have given way to a virtual no-mans land dotted with mines, sandbagged bunkers and guard posts. The Civilian Controlled Zone or CCZ is surrounded by a barbed wire fence while the DMZ is marked by 4-metre-high (13-ft.-high) wall crawling with soldiers. The soldiers from the 21st Infantry Division which routinely patrols the zone, enjoy a bit of wildlife watching, whilst performing their duties. Scientists say the zone, encompassing soaring mountains, rolling lowlands and coastal wetlands, is one of the most biologically rich regions on the Korean Peninsula. It serves as the wintering grounds for at least two endangered species _ the white-naped and red-crowned cranes _ among hundreds of other bird species. Fifty mammals live here, including the rare Asiatic black bear, Amur leopard and, some believe, the Siberian Tiger. More than 1,000 different plant species thrive. For years, conservationists have demanded the DMZ and the CCZ be proclaimed a nature reserve. They have recently stepped up those calls amid increased development around the DMZ and the possibly that two countries may reconcile. Conservationists worry about two scenarios. Peace, they fear, could bring increased development, a revival of farming and expansion of nearby communities into the DMZ. And if North Korea's economy collapses, it could bring a flood of refugees into the zone. The conflict ended in a cease-fire, not a peace treaty and North and South Korea remain technically at war. Inside, the military presence is intertwined with nature. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4c56594a77b6ba435b5d2302bceb1a88 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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New Forest Nature Quest (15 min) - Chris Packham in 1995 Wildlife in the UK - Archive Video

New Forest Nature Quest (15 min) - Chris Packham in 1995 Wildlife in the UK - Archive Video

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  • Duration: 15:20
  • Updated: 17 Nov 2014
  • views: 443
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When Chris Packham put us forward to produce a programme specifically about wildlife in the UK for the new owners of the site at Ashurst in the New Forest in 1995, we were delighted to do it. The programme was aimed at younger visitors and to promote New Forest Nature Quest as an innovative new visitor attraction. Our cameraman Paul Cranston worked with a wildlife cameraman Andrew McClenaghan, to film many UK animals, some of which are only very rarely seen. Chris had great knowledge of the New Forest and took us to several secret places where we filmed badgers, hedgehogs, and even tracked down water vole. On the Nature Quest site itself we met a pine marten, stoats and wild boar. It is very sad that New Forest Nature Quest was not a commercial success and closed not long after it opened, and was taken over by the Heap Family and is now the New Forest Wildlife Park www.newforestwildlifepark.co.uk but this superb programme survives as a reminder of a very innovative visitor attraction. This is archive footage from our 30+ years in the video and audio production business and therefore quality of footage may reflect this. About us: Focus are a UK based multimedia communications agency specialising in audio and video. We help businesses use video and audio to maximise their sales impact and keep ahead of their competitors. We have a fully equipped ISDN studio and green screen facilities in Southampton, Hampshire and an office in Cambridge. See our portfolio for examples of web video for business, podcasts and webinars produced for health and safety, training and employee communications, product launches, tourism, science, technology, aerial and the maritime sectors. In marketing surveys, 90% of customers have said that video helps buying decisions – find out more by joining one of our Breakfast Briefings or request a Free Guide to Video (see website). A video can be used on your website or social media as part of your digital marketing strategy, giving cost effective online sales and marketing 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you are interested in a corporate or promotional video or ISDN audio services, please contact us on (+44) 23 8044 8822 or biz@focusbiz.co.uk For more information, please see our websites: http://www.focusbiz.co.uk http://www.focus-studios.co.uk or keep in touch via Twitter https://twitter.com/Focusbiz
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ایران کی وائلڈ لائف|Wild Life Iran|SaharTV Urdu

ایران کی وائلڈ لائف|Wild Life Iran|SaharTV Urdu

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  • Duration: 29:00
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2014
  • views: 2590
videos
Broadcast Date-:-March 23 2014 -Website: http://urdu.sahartv.ir/archive/video/ -Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/saharurdutv -Twitter: https://twitter.com/SaharTvUrdu -Google+ www.gplus.to/saharurdutv
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People, Wildlife Scooped Up in Texas Rescues

People, Wildlife Scooped Up in Texas Rescues

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  • Duration: 2:30
  • Updated: 05 Sep 2017
  • views: 36
videos
(30 Aug 2017) Rescue efforts are continuing for the residents of Katy, Texas in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Ken Smith's family left the city on Saturday, while he hunkered down in their home hoping that the rising water levels would not overwhelm his house. After helping rescue some neighbors earlier in the week, Smith he decided to leave after water levels became too high Wednesday, with over 5 feet of water outside his front door. It is not only residents who are being fished out of the water in Katy. Game wardens rescued a deer Game Warden Mark Frayser, with a team of search and rescue game wardens, captured the deer and loaded it into a small dingy. "Since he is a hard-antlered buck, we are always worried about his antlers and the goring," said game warden Drew Spencer. "So, we wanted to secure those first and then the feet were really kicking in and so we hogtied him." The buck bounded away from his rescuers after he was released on high, dry ground. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ac75ff2bd2c797db92dc08ec7428b21f Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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win7_scenic-demoshort_raw + Wildlife

win7_scenic-demoshort_raw + Wildlife

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  • Duration: 0:41
  • Updated: 27 Apr 2017
  • views: 13
videos
RAR supports only RAR format archives, which have .rar file name extension by default. ZIP and other formats are not supported. Even if you specify .zip extension when creating an archive, it will still be in RAR format. Windows users may install WinRAR, which supports more archive types including RAR and ZIP formats.
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