• Bear hugs for wildlife rehabilitators

    (14 Oct 2016) LEAD IN: An American wildlife rehabilitator is grabbing attention for his hands on approach to helping injured and unwanted animals. Jim Kowalczik is a fan of bear hugs, especially with Jimbo who he's looked after since a cub at his upstate New York haven. STORY-LINE: Jim Kowalczik knows how to give a good bear hug. He's had practice - horsing around with his 1,500 pound buddy, a Kodiak bear named Jimbo. Jimbo is among 11 bears living at the couple's Orphaned Wildlife Center in upstate New York. "They're content. They're happy. If they weren't, you would know it. And I wouldn't be doing this," says Kowalczik Jim and Susan Kowalczik's not-for-profit center takes in injured and unwanted animals. The main goal is to release animals they care for. But they say they ca...

    published: 16 Nov 2016
  • Tanzanian wildlife. Archive film 95304

    Tanzania. Safari, cape buffalo. Gnu, wildebeest. Antelopes, Thompson's Gazelle, Jackal, wild dogs, ostrich, zebras, rhinos, (charging). Animal migrations. Lions under trees and eating.

    published: 09 Mar 2016
  • New Scientist TV Wildlife archive

    published: 04 Nov 2011
  • 10 NEW Species of Wildlife We JUST DISCOVERED

    Welcome to Top10Archive! Earth is a vast planet, massive to a degree that we may not quite comprehend yet. From an article published by National Geographic, humans have only discovered 15% of the species alive on our planet. The installment that follows will cover ten of those newly discovered species, gems that Mother Nature, up until recently, was able to hide from our prying eyes. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn 10. Bumba Lennoni 9. Etendeka 8. Keesingia Gigas 7. Moroccan Flic-Flac Spider 6. Araguaian River Dolphin 5. Edwardsiella Andrillae 4. Tuberochernes cohni and Hesperochernes bradybaughii 3. Phryganistria heusii yentuensis 2. Limnonectes larvaepartus 1. Ampulex Dementor References: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnbQv6J6XtI https://www.youtube.com/...

    published: 28 Oct 2015
  • New Forest Nature Quest (15 min) - Chris Packham in 1995 Wildlife in the UK - Archive Video

    When Chris Packham put us forward to produce a programme specifically about wildlife in the UK for the new owners of the site at Ashurst in the New Forest in 1995, we were delighted to do it. The programme was aimed at younger visitors and to promote New Forest Nature Quest as an innovative new visitor attraction. Our cameraman Paul Cranston worked with a wildlife cameraman Andrew McClenaghan, to film many UK animals, some of which are only very rarely seen. Chris had great knowledge of the New Forest and took us to several secret places where we filmed badgers, hedgehogs, and even tracked down water vole. On the Nature Quest site itself we met a pine marten, stoats and wild boar. It is very sad that New Forest Nature Quest was not a commercial success and closed not long after it o...

    published: 17 Nov 2014
  • Footage Archive Showreel - Wildlife Images

    A collection of example video from the CambrianFilms footage archive. All material created by Dee Doody Productions, a division of cambrian films. For more info on how to purchase footage and our services, please visit the website - www.cambrianfilms.com

    published: 18 Oct 2007
  • The impact of the volcanic erruption on Iceland's wildlife

    (30 Apr 2010) AP Television Southern Iceland, April 21, 2010 1. Various aerial shots of Eyjafjalla volcano during eruption 2. Various shots of surrounding countryside,including ash-strewn roads and long shots of the volcano 3. Various shots of Icelandic horses 4. Set up shots of Halldor Runoltsson, Iceland's Chief Veterinary 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Halldor Runoltsson, Iceland's Chief Veterinary "Some of the horses that have been outside have been doing very well. As for wildlife we haven't seen any casualties either. Some of the birds were affected for example last Saturday when the downfall of ash was worse they seen to try to try to escape inside barns and stables, but there have been no reports of casualties. So far so good." AP Television Reykjavik, April 24, 2010 6. Mid sh...

    published: 24 Jul 2015
  • ELSG Audio Archive - Wildlife in Ewyas Lacy

    ORAL HISTORY: Wildlife in Ewyas Lacy Recordings are extracted from interviews conducted by the Longtown and District Historical Society, and are reproduced with their kind permission. The narrator describes his memories of insect and bird life in the Rowlestone area, as he walked over summer fields covered in cobwebs, ‘like a carpet’.

    published: 24 Oct 2015
  • A Year in the Life of an African Wildlife Photographer with Andy Biggs

    Join renowned African wildlife photographer and workshop instructor Andy Biggs as he shares a typical year in his life as a wildlife photographer by discussing the myriad safari locations he travels to in Africa. Andy Biggs Photography http://www.andybiggs.com

    published: 02 Sep 2015
  • win7_scenic-demoshort_raw + Wildlife

    RAR supports only RAR format archives, which have .rar file name extension by default. ZIP and other formats are not supported. Even if you specify .zip extension when creating an archive, it will still be in RAR format. Windows users may install WinRAR, which supports more archive types including RAR and ZIP formats.

    published: 27 Apr 2017
  • WILDLIFE USA - COLOUR - SOUND

    You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9e3f77baedfe4877b50a28731eae0bc8 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Opening of endangered wildlife conference

    SHOTLIST 1. Opening of CITES conference 2. Various of delegations in audience 3. Willem Wijnstekers addressing audience 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Willem Wijnstekers, CITES secretary-general: "What this 30-year-old convention urgently needs, ladies and gentlemen, is an increased political will in most, if not all, of its 166 parties. Political will to take responsibility and to meet obligations. CITES is in u-r-g-e-n-t need of action rather than words." 5. Audience 6. Klaus Topfer addressing audience 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Klaus Topfer, Executive director of United Nations Environment Programme: "Altogether, I sincerely hope that these two weeks are again a successful work for the benefit of the people on this globe." 8. Various of audience 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Thaksin Shinawatra,...

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • 100 pangolins seized in wildlife smuggling crackdown

    (26 Sep 2011) SHOTLIST 1. Close of pangolin in cage 2. Mid of trafficked pangolins in cage 3. Mid tilt down of customs officer watering pangolins 4. Close of pangolins in cage 5. Mid of pangolin in cage crawling towards water 6. Wide of photographer taking photos of displayed pangolins, pan to pangolins tied up in blue bags 7. Close of pangolin in bag 8. Close of sign reading (Thai) "Seized 97 Pangolins, Food and Alcohol worth 3 (m) million Baht (96-thousand US dollars)" 9. Wide of Prasong Poontaneat, Director-General of Thai Customs Department speaking to media 10. Close of pangolin in cage 11. SOUNDBITE (Thai) Prasong Poontaneat, Director-General of Thai Customs Department: "These pangolins were hidden under other products that covered them. There were illegally ...

    published: 30 Jul 2015
  • Hundreds of wild elephants relocated to new sanctuary

    (19 Jul 2016) LEAD IN: Wildlife experts in Malawi are embarking on a massive project to move 500 elephants from a crowded national park to a new home 300 kilometres (185 miles) away. They hope the sanctuary could eventually serve as a sanctuary to restore elephant populations in other parts of Africa where the threatened species is being poached. STORY-LINE: This helicopter crew is setting off on a mission to track down elephants in Malawi's Liwonde National Park. The team spots a small group and shoots them with tranquilliser darts. The animals don't know it, but this is the first step on their way to a new home. "Right so they've found a group there, they are busy pushing them down the hill, so this hill in front of us Tinguni, so they are going to try and push them out of ...

    published: 16 Nov 2016
  • Report paints bleak picture of wildlife numbers

    (27 Oct 2016) Global wildlife populations have fallen an average of 58 percent from 1970 levels, with human activity reducing the numbers of elephants in Tanzania, maned wolves in Brazil, salamanders in the United States and orcas in the waters of Europe, researchers say. Deforestation, pollution, over fishing and the illegal wildlife trade, together with climate change, "are pushing species populations to the edge," according to the Living Planet report released on Thursday by WWF and the Zoological Society of London. "This is of course a cause of concern, the statistics are quite alarming," said Louise McRae, Zoological Society of London (ZSL) Project Manager and one of the lead researchers for The Living Planet report. The assessment predicts that by 2020, populations of vertebrate s...

    published: 06 Nov 2016
  • WILDLIFE PARK - NO SOUND - COLOUR

    MOST TYPES OF ANIMALS AND BIRDS IN ZOO LIKE PARK. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d19c43a31e564857aa1e50a0cf44abc0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

    published: 21 Jul 2015
Bear hugs for wildlife rehabilitators

Bear hugs for wildlife rehabilitators

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:34
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2016
  • views: 4013
videos
(14 Oct 2016) LEAD IN: An American wildlife rehabilitator is grabbing attention for his hands on approach to helping injured and unwanted animals. Jim Kowalczik is a fan of bear hugs, especially with Jimbo who he's looked after since a cub at his upstate New York haven. STORY-LINE: Jim Kowalczik knows how to give a good bear hug. He's had practice - horsing around with his 1,500 pound buddy, a Kodiak bear named Jimbo. Jimbo is among 11 bears living at the couple's Orphaned Wildlife Center in upstate New York. "They're content. They're happy. If they weren't, you would know it. And I wouldn't be doing this," says Kowalczik Jim and Susan Kowalczik's not-for-profit center takes in injured and unwanted animals. The main goal is to release animals they care for. But they say they can't with the bears either because of injuries or because they were already used to living in captivity. While there are plenty of wildlife rehabilitators and other centers that care for bears, none do it quite like Kowalczik. His hands-on approach has garnered international attention The 60-year-old retired corrections officer says its not for show. He's just bullish on bears. "There's no false pretences like there are with people and stuff. What you see is what you get," he says. Experts warn not to try this with any bear. One wildlife rehabilitator says she worries people seeing the videos will think they can play with or feed wild bears. "The message it sends concerns me _ that everything can be a pet, everything can be habituated. Even a 1,500-pound bear can be your friend," says wildlife rehabilitator Missy Runyan. Kowalczik says the biggest problem with Jimbo, who he's had for 23 years, is making sure he doesn't lay on him Where some see danger he prefers to grin and bear it. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/43b66fb3a3667afa5b56cbc0ec82b7bf Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Bear_Hugs_For_Wildlife_Rehabilitators
Tanzanian wildlife.  Archive film 95304

Tanzanian wildlife. Archive film 95304

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:41
  • Updated: 09 Mar 2016
  • views: 31
videos
Tanzania. Safari, cape buffalo. Gnu, wildebeest. Antelopes, Thompson's Gazelle, Jackal, wild dogs, ostrich, zebras, rhinos, (charging). Animal migrations. Lions under trees and eating.
https://wn.com/Tanzanian_Wildlife._Archive_Film_95304
New Scientist TV  Wildlife archive

New Scientist TV Wildlife archive

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:44
  • Updated: 04 Nov 2011
  • views: 97
videos
https://wn.com/New_Scientist_Tv_Wildlife_Archive
10 NEW Species of Wildlife We JUST DISCOVERED

10 NEW Species of Wildlife We JUST DISCOVERED

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:18
  • Updated: 28 Oct 2015
  • views: 2813743
videos
Welcome to Top10Archive! Earth is a vast planet, massive to a degree that we may not quite comprehend yet. From an article published by National Geographic, humans have only discovered 15% of the species alive on our planet. The installment that follows will cover ten of those newly discovered species, gems that Mother Nature, up until recently, was able to hide from our prying eyes. Support us by shopping on Amazon! http://tinyurl.com/njwyzzn 10. Bumba Lennoni 9. Etendeka 8. Keesingia Gigas 7. Moroccan Flic-Flac Spider 6. Araguaian River Dolphin 5. Edwardsiella Andrillae 4. Tuberochernes cohni and Hesperochernes bradybaughii 3. Phryganistria heusii yentuensis 2. Limnonectes larvaepartus 1. Ampulex Dementor References: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnbQv6J6XtI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DVg2EJvvlF8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvBCmY7wAAU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0MrgI97GYw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmhohRXn_LY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmfLlBKGMuU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCNBoF5b7f0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPSriCpFCpc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qO1tS0RJeo4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tax5JR63E5s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4odlo0Afjs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lwuItwsyP4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJhTrPDUoxs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9oxmRT2YWw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOtGbzUtjiw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RerXsbuJ1S4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbCAFt2b4lI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNJSWlMsQ58 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZWBwCXzQhw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQEiYWGitKs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNnJ1mOkIx8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBYvCJLb7tE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F2Z-kJ-1Ho https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-63JgNPB5jg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXy5DehVTBE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywEjrCFy3iI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhjkeZm9Lu0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BasY65AOJ54 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYCcT0s5elo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E77UIKvO1Ic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siV92DtLIFc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHUlbZwtik0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMe2JP_HvTM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ySwuQhruBo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKhEFVAoScI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWAV1zj5TXQ Voice Over Talent: https://www.youtube.com/user/thought2
https://wn.com/10_New_Species_Of_Wildlife_We_Just_Discovered
New Forest Nature Quest (15 min) - Chris Packham in 1995 Wildlife in the UK - Archive Video

New Forest Nature Quest (15 min) - Chris Packham in 1995 Wildlife in the UK - Archive Video

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:20
  • Updated: 17 Nov 2014
  • views: 443
videos
When Chris Packham put us forward to produce a programme specifically about wildlife in the UK for the new owners of the site at Ashurst in the New Forest in 1995, we were delighted to do it. The programme was aimed at younger visitors and to promote New Forest Nature Quest as an innovative new visitor attraction. Our cameraman Paul Cranston worked with a wildlife cameraman Andrew McClenaghan, to film many UK animals, some of which are only very rarely seen. Chris had great knowledge of the New Forest and took us to several secret places where we filmed badgers, hedgehogs, and even tracked down water vole. On the Nature Quest site itself we met a pine marten, stoats and wild boar. It is very sad that New Forest Nature Quest was not a commercial success and closed not long after it opened, and was taken over by the Heap Family and is now the New Forest Wildlife Park www.newforestwildlifepark.co.uk but this superb programme survives as a reminder of a very innovative visitor attraction. This is archive footage from our 30+ years in the video and audio production business and therefore quality of footage may reflect this. About us: Focus are a UK based multimedia communications agency specialising in audio and video. We help businesses use video and audio to maximise their sales impact and keep ahead of their competitors. We have a fully equipped ISDN studio and green screen facilities in Southampton, Hampshire and an office in Cambridge. See our portfolio for examples of web video for business, podcasts and webinars produced for health and safety, training and employee communications, product launches, tourism, science, technology, aerial and the maritime sectors. In marketing surveys, 90% of customers have said that video helps buying decisions – find out more by joining one of our Breakfast Briefings or request a Free Guide to Video (see website). A video can be used on your website or social media as part of your digital marketing strategy, giving cost effective online sales and marketing 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you are interested in a corporate or promotional video or ISDN audio services, please contact us on (+44) 23 8044 8822 or biz@focusbiz.co.uk For more information, please see our websites: http://www.focusbiz.co.uk http://www.focus-studios.co.uk or keep in touch via Twitter https://twitter.com/Focusbiz
https://wn.com/New_Forest_Nature_Quest_(15_Min)_Chris_Packham_In_1995_Wildlife_In_The_UK_Archive_Video
Footage Archive Showreel - Wildlife Images

Footage Archive Showreel - Wildlife Images

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:49
  • Updated: 18 Oct 2007
  • views: 561
videos
A collection of example video from the CambrianFilms footage archive. All material created by Dee Doody Productions, a division of cambrian films. For more info on how to purchase footage and our services, please visit the website - www.cambrianfilms.com
https://wn.com/Footage_Archive_Showreel_Wildlife_Images
The impact of the volcanic erruption on Iceland's wildlife

The impact of the volcanic erruption on Iceland's wildlife

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:26
  • Updated: 24 Jul 2015
  • views: 48
videos
(30 Apr 2010) AP Television Southern Iceland, April 21, 2010 1. Various aerial shots of Eyjafjalla volcano during eruption 2. Various shots of surrounding countryside,including ash-strewn roads and long shots of the volcano 3. Various shots of Icelandic horses 4. Set up shots of Halldor Runoltsson, Iceland's Chief Veterinary 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Halldor Runoltsson, Iceland's Chief Veterinary "Some of the horses that have been outside have been doing very well. As for wildlife we haven't seen any casualties either. Some of the birds were affected for example last Saturday when the downfall of ash was worse they seen to try to try to escape inside barns and stables, but there have been no reports of casualties. So far so good." AP Television Reykjavik, April 24, 2010 6. Mid shot of lake 7. Various shots of swans 8. Various shots of waterfowl 9. Set up shots of Olafur Einarsson, ornithologist 10. Mid shot water fowl 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Olafur Einarsson, Ornithologist: "Not anything serious. Not at all. I would say some problems for the birds when the ash cloud was biggest a week ago. It could have had some effects on the birds coming towards Iceland. Migrating birds." AP Television Southern Iceland, April 24, 2010 12. Various shots of bean geese 13. Mid shot of Franklin's gull 14. Various shots of Eurasian Oystercatcher 15. SOUNDBITE: (English) Olafur Einarsson, Ornithologist: "It depends on the ash, the amount of ash that comes from the crater. Probably we will have less ash now. The eruption in the volcano is getting longer and there is less water in the crater. Therefore we will probably have more lava flow from the crater. Therefore the influence on the fauna and the flora will be less." 16. Various shots of Solheimajokull glacier 17. Various shots of Urridafoss waterfall 18. Wide shot of beach at Stokkseyri 19. Various shots of seaweed 20. Various shots of beach LEAD IN: The eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjalla volcano caused the worst crisis in the history of air traffic. But wildlife experts are confident the volcano ash will not have a negative impact on the country's flora and fauna. STORY LINE: On April 14, 2010 Eyjafjalla volcano in southern Iceland started erupting. The 1666 metre (5465.81 feet) high volcano, which had remained dormant since 1823, is partially covered by Eyjafjallayokull glacier. The combination of lava and water from the melted ice caused an ash cloud that gradually covered three quarters of this island country. Only hours after the start of the eruption the surrounding countryside was covered with a layer of black ash. During the cold Icelandic winter months all cattle and livestock are kept indoors. Hence so far the only known animals affected by the eruption are the Icelandic horses living in the wilderness and some bird species. The unique horse breed developed from ponies brought by Scandinavian settlers during the 9th and 10th centuries. They've remained a pure breed ever since. It constitutes one of Iceland's greatest sources of pride. Halldor Runoltsson is the Chief Veterinary of Iceland, a post that works within the influence of the country's Ministry of Agriculture. Runoltsson says that due to the low concentration of harmful minerals in the ash coming from the volcano the local fauna has avoided an environmental catastrophe. "Some of the horses that have been outside have been doing very well. As for wildlife we haven't seen any casualties either. Some of the birds were affected for example last Saturday when the downfall of ash was worse they seen to try to try to escape inside barns and stables, but there have been no reports of casualties. So far so good." This lake in Reykjavik is home to many of Iceland's 350 bird species. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/a417df1f3ba91eec4104f7e89ae0afc6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/The_Impact_Of_The_Volcanic_Erruption_On_Iceland's_Wildlife
ELSG Audio Archive - Wildlife in Ewyas Lacy

ELSG Audio Archive - Wildlife in Ewyas Lacy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:09
  • Updated: 24 Oct 2015
  • views: 16
videos
ORAL HISTORY: Wildlife in Ewyas Lacy Recordings are extracted from interviews conducted by the Longtown and District Historical Society, and are reproduced with their kind permission. The narrator describes his memories of insect and bird life in the Rowlestone area, as he walked over summer fields covered in cobwebs, ‘like a carpet’.
https://wn.com/Elsg_Audio_Archive_Wildlife_In_Ewyas_Lacy
A Year in the Life of an African Wildlife Photographer with Andy Biggs

A Year in the Life of an African Wildlife Photographer with Andy Biggs

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:04:03
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2015
  • views: 32587
videos
Join renowned African wildlife photographer and workshop instructor Andy Biggs as he shares a typical year in his life as a wildlife photographer by discussing the myriad safari locations he travels to in Africa. Andy Biggs Photography http://www.andybiggs.com
https://wn.com/A_Year_In_The_Life_Of_An_African_Wildlife_Photographer_With_Andy_Biggs
win7_scenic-demoshort_raw + Wildlife

win7_scenic-demoshort_raw + Wildlife

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:41
  • Updated: 27 Apr 2017
  • views: 11
videos
RAR supports only RAR format archives, which have .rar file name extension by default. ZIP and other formats are not supported. Even if you specify .zip extension when creating an archive, it will still be in RAR format. Windows users may install WinRAR, which supports more archive types including RAR and ZIP formats.
https://wn.com/Win7_Scenic_Demoshort_Raw_Wildlife
WILDLIFE USA - COLOUR - SOUND

WILDLIFE USA - COLOUR - SOUND

  • Order:
  • Duration: 27:36
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 245
videos
You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9e3f77baedfe4877b50a28731eae0bc8 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Wildlife_USA_Colour_Sound
Opening of endangered wildlife conference

Opening of endangered wildlife conference

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:45
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 23
videos
SHOTLIST 1. Opening of CITES conference 2. Various of delegations in audience 3. Willem Wijnstekers addressing audience 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Willem Wijnstekers, CITES secretary-general: "What this 30-year-old convention urgently needs, ladies and gentlemen, is an increased political will in most, if not all, of its 166 parties. Political will to take responsibility and to meet obligations. CITES is in u-r-g-e-n-t need of action rather than words." 5. Audience 6. Klaus Topfer addressing audience 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Klaus Topfer, Executive director of United Nations Environment Programme: "Altogether, I sincerely hope that these two weeks are again a successful work for the benefit of the people on this globe." 8. Various of audience 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Thaksin Shinawatra, Thai prime minister: "The problem, however, extends well beyond our borders and jurisdiction. Acting alone, we cannot fully eliminate the illegal activity even in our own country. Acting together, we can all make a difference in tackling this serious problem." 10. Audience with Shinawatra speaking 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Thaksin Shinawatra, Thai prime minister: "I would therefore like to declare that Thailand is prepared to take the lead in the formation of a new Southeast Asian regional law enforcement network to combat nature crimes." 12. Shinawatra and officials walk down aisle 13. Various of delegates at convention 14. Various of protest against illegally imported orangutans 15. SOUNDBITE (English) Edwin Wiek, Founder of Wildlife Rescue Centre: "I think this is a very serious case. We're talking about the biggest smuggling case in apes ever in the world. Were talking about 115 apes in one place and another 100 apes in other places around the country. I think this is a significant case. Very big." 16. Various of demonstrators 17. Shinawatra standing with demonstrators STORYLINE Wildlife conservationists were expected to push for new trade restrictions to protect fast-disappearing animals and plants, while lobbyists were set to try to free up commerce in some species at international talks that started in Bangkok on Saturday. The two-week conference brings together thousands of delegates from the 166 countries that have signed the United Nations' Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, or CITES. The voluntary agreement, introduced in 1975, is meant to protect about 30-thousand animals and plants, some of which are threatened with extinction because of commercial trade. About 50 proposals were expected to be submitted during the meeting to legitimise or block trade in some species. Environmentalists say wildlife sales generate (B) billions of dollars annually, making it the world's third-largest illicit enterprise after drug trafficking and illegal arms sales. Willem Wijintekers, the CITES secretary general, said the convention was "in u-r-g-e-n-t need of action rather than words" and needed stronger political and financial commitments by governments, less red tape and a more simplified approach to wildlife management. Host nation Thailand has made strides in cracking down on illicit wildlife trade in recent years, but the country remains a hub for the sale and export of protected species due to corruption and weak law enforcement. About 150 activists protested outside the conference hall on Saturday, demanding the return of Thai elephants sold to zoos abroad and Indonesian orangutans allegedly smuggled into Thailand for use in boxing matches to entertain tourists at a local wildlife park. But he said he was prepared to take the lead in forming a new Southeast Asian regional law enforcement network to combat nature crimes. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e90a47a89bf4371881797f0442d3c560 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Opening_Of_Endangered_Wildlife_Conference
100 pangolins seized in wildlife smuggling crackdown

100 pangolins seized in wildlife smuggling crackdown

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:35
  • Updated: 30 Jul 2015
  • views: 9985
videos
(26 Sep 2011) SHOTLIST 1. Close of pangolin in cage 2. Mid of trafficked pangolins in cage 3. Mid tilt down of customs officer watering pangolins 4. Close of pangolins in cage 5. Mid of pangolin in cage crawling towards water 6. Wide of photographer taking photos of displayed pangolins, pan to pangolins tied up in blue bags 7. Close of pangolin in bag 8. Close of sign reading (Thai) "Seized 97 Pangolins, Food and Alcohol worth 3 (m) million Baht (96-thousand US dollars)" 9. Wide of Prasong Poontaneat, Director-General of Thai Customs Department speaking to media 10. Close of pangolin in cage 11. SOUNDBITE (Thai) Prasong Poontaneat, Director-General of Thai Customs Department: "These pangolins were hidden under other products that covered them. There were illegally exported outside Thailand and are commonly traded for people to eat. We were able to arrest the smugglers in Pranburi District." 12. Wide tracking shot of customs officer taking pangolins in bags out of van and putting them on ground 13. Tracking shot from pangolin in bag to others in bags lying on ground STORYLINE Thai authorities said on Monday they''ve seized nearly 100 pangolins that were being illegally trafficked to another country as a food delicacy. The scaly ant-eating animals are protected under an international convention protecting the endangered species. Customs Department Director-General Prasong Poontaneat said that officials chased a pickup truck on Sunday evening after it fled a checkpoint in Prachuap Khiri Khan province in the South. They found 97 pangolins worth approximately one (m) million baht (32-thousand US dollars) in the back of the truck. All the seized pangolins were displayed at Thai Customs Headquarters on Monday morning. Prasong says the mammals might have come from Malaysia or Indonesia. He says they were en route to either Vietnam or China to be eaten. Pangolin meat can fetch up to 350 US dollars per kilogram. Prasong says the Thai driver has been arrested. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/970399d134e249435eccaa4bb25cd2c5 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/100_Pangolins_Seized_In_Wildlife_Smuggling_Crackdown
Hundreds of wild elephants relocated to new sanctuary

Hundreds of wild elephants relocated to new sanctuary

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  • Duration: 7:18
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2016
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(19 Jul 2016) LEAD IN: Wildlife experts in Malawi are embarking on a massive project to move 500 elephants from a crowded national park to a new home 300 kilometres (185 miles) away. They hope the sanctuary could eventually serve as a sanctuary to restore elephant populations in other parts of Africa where the threatened species is being poached. STORY-LINE: This helicopter crew is setting off on a mission to track down elephants in Malawi's Liwonde National Park. The team spots a small group and shoots them with tranquilliser darts. The animals don't know it, but this is the first step on their way to a new home. "Right so they've found a group there, they are busy pushing them down the hill, so this hill in front of us Tinguni, so they are going to try and push them out of the woodland and then try and try and get them on to the floodplain," says conservationist Kester Vickery, who is leading the team on the ground. Once the animals are sedated, they are checked by vets and fitted with tracking collars, before being hoisted onto trucks. This massive operation aims to relocate 500 elephants from two wildlife parks, Majete and Liwonde, to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve 300 kilometres (185 miles) away. Craig Reid, Liwonde National Park Manager says moving the elephants is necessary to stop them coming into conflict with people. "Here in Liwonde we have too many elephants with a very high density of people around the park, so there's a lot of human wildlife conflict and moving the elephants from Liwonde will reduce the pressure on the local communities," he says. "And then on the other hand at Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve we are busy setting up a national elephant sanctuary for Malawi. So having 500 elephants there by the end of next year will set it up extremely well as a significant elephant conservation project." Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve is a park of 700 square miles (1,800 square kilometres) with more space and security for the elephants. The relocation by African Parks, a non-profit group based in Johannesburg, comes amid increasing pressure on wildlife across much of Africa. There is particular pressure on elephants, which have been slaughtered in large numbers to meet growing demand for ivory, mostly in parts of Asia. The conservationists hope that they can build a thriving elephant population at Nkhotakota, which could be used to supply elephants to parts of Africa where the species has been badly affected by poaching. The Dutch PostCode Lottery, which supports a number of charity programs, is a key funder of the 1.6 million US dollar relocation project. African Parks Malawi country director, Patricio Ndadzela, says transporting the elephants is a massive undertaking. "It's not easy, it's not easy. Imagine we are spending 1,6 million (US) dollars, hiring all the expertise, all the vehicles, the helicopters and the sort of logistics that goes with getting this done," he says. "Well, I mean our priority is to ensure that the animals are alive, but I think there are a lot of associated problems, vehicle break downs, sometimes animals getting injured or sometime they die, but I think above all, I think this is a huge task it has never happened before in Africa. I understand Zimbabwe tried it, but they didn't get as much as 500 elephants in two years. This is a record. It's a record." African Parks manages all three reserves involved in the operation. Nkhotakota currently has fewer than 100 elephants, whereas Malawi has up to 1,500 elephants in total. The World Wildlife Fund estimates that Africa has fewer than 470,000 elephants, down from as many as three million to five million in the early 20th century. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/a152484488fa21168b051e6bee357d8d Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Report paints bleak picture of wildlife numbers

Report paints bleak picture of wildlife numbers

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  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 06 Nov 2016
  • views: 24
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(27 Oct 2016) Global wildlife populations have fallen an average of 58 percent from 1970 levels, with human activity reducing the numbers of elephants in Tanzania, maned wolves in Brazil, salamanders in the United States and orcas in the waters of Europe, researchers say. Deforestation, pollution, over fishing and the illegal wildlife trade, together with climate change, "are pushing species populations to the edge," according to the Living Planet report released on Thursday by WWF and the Zoological Society of London. "This is of course a cause of concern, the statistics are quite alarming," said Louise McRae, Zoological Society of London (ZSL) Project Manager and one of the lead researchers for The Living Planet report. The assessment predicts that by 2020, populations of vertebrate species could have fallen by 67 percent from 1970 levels unless action is taken to reverse the damaging impacts of human activity. One of the key actions pushing the decline is the growing number of humans, which is driving overfishing, hunting and the destruction of habitats. The report detailed the strain that agriculture places on freshwater systems. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1fe38ad401a4f8f61a5c0936e07ac782 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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WILDLIFE PARK - NO SOUND - COLOUR

WILDLIFE PARK - NO SOUND - COLOUR

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  • Duration: 10:50
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 72
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MOST TYPES OF ANIMALS AND BIRDS IN ZOO LIKE PARK. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d19c43a31e564857aa1e50a0cf44abc0 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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